Web Design, Programming, and Business

Listen To What Your Clients Need (Especially in a Recession)

Especially with the current pandemic shutdown, businesses are having trouble making ends meet¬† and you may be among them! As a web design firm owner, I’ve been looking at ways to keep our work queue full, so that we can make it through this recession without too much trouble. The answer is simple: offer what our clients need.

While we always try to do exactly that, it’s especially true now. Clients that are facing economic hardship will put off a new web design unless it’s absolutely necessary. However, depending on the industry, there are services that could really help them right now.

Web designers should focus on what clients need during the pandemic shutdown. For restaurants, offer online shopping with pickup options. For service providers, offer online services. Overall, give clients a way to keep in contact with their customers, reaching them on social media and email.

Restaurants and local markets

With social distancing, eating out is no longer possible. However, if a restaurant can offer pickup or delivery, they can still stay open.  So you, as the web designer should offer them online store solutions. Square and Ecwid are both excellent solutions for this since they are incredibly easy to use, can be integrated into an existing site, and are very affordable. If the client is on a shoestring budget, you can set up the store for them and let them enter in all the products.

After the store is online, update their Facebook profile to call out their delivery or pickup options. Remember that this shutdown is temporary but growing a social media following will continue into the recovery. The same holds true for email marketing — now is the time to grow these customer lists.

Service Providers

For service providers offering repairs, they could still offer drop off and pickup services. For fitness coaches or counselors, they could offer online services through Zoom meetings or other online streaming services. Be creative as you come up with solutions that will work specifically for their business. Once you understand what they’re going through, you can use your creativity and technical expertise to better benefit them.

Rising above the competition

When the economy stagnates, the cream rises to the top. Only the best get the business. Help your customers with their marketing and their offerings so they can be a top result in their customers’ next Google search. Now may be the time for Google paid ads, or more social marketing, or an email campaign. Usually I focus on more long-term marketing strategies but short-term strategies are more key now.

Focus on niche markets

There are certain markets that are still thriving in this economy though and markets that remain unaffected. For example, gun sale and emergency preparedness sites are doing well. By focusing on a niche industry, and specializing your services on what they need specifically, you’ll have plenty of work to keep you busy. To find a good industry, check on Google for the latest trends.

Offer discounts and freebies

Perhaps you’re still getting leads but not closing them. If prospective clients are wanting to ‘wait and see’, give them an extra incentive to sign with you. Offer them a discount on hosting or ongoing updates, or even a bigger incentive, something free. You could offer them free hosting, free search engine optimization, or social media promotions.

Bottom line: listen to what your clients need

If you put yourself in your clients’ shoes, and truly offer what they need most, you’ll be amazed at how much work you’ll get. Your clients will also be happier with you since you’re listening and giving them what they need most. Lastly, remember to tell each client to share your information with others that could use your services.

Lastly, if you enjoyed this article, come back next week for a new post or follow me on Facebook. Now get out there and do good work.

About the author

Aaron Day

Professionally building websites since 2002, I've worked at Microsoft, multiple agencies, and a few web design businesses of my own. I've been an owner of Thrive Web Designs since 2015. I've taught classes, run design groups and even ran a benefit auction for 4 years in my free time. I love sharing and giving back to the web/creative community.

By Aaron Day
Web Design, Programming, and Business

Meet Aaron Day

Professionally building websites since 2002, I've worked at Microsoft, multiple agencies, and a few web design businesses of my own. I've been an owner of Thrive Web Designs since 2015. I've taught classes, run design groups and even ran a benefit auction for 4 years in my free time. I love sharing and giving back to the web/creative community.

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